From the Editor

Aloha,

We hope you enjoy this issue of Yoga Samachar. From Guruji’s historic journey to China to the Heartland’s outstanding regional conference in Chicago, there’s a broad range of perspectives offered in this edition. This issue also includes many voices remembering and honoring beloved teachers. We would love to hear your voice. Please send us articles, ideas, editorials, research findings, sequences, poetry, pictures, prop innovations, artwork, quotes, book reviews, and anything else you’d like to share. Selected submissions might also be posted on the IYNAUS website. Please send all comments and submissions to yogasamachar@iynaus.org. We encourage you to visit the newly revamped IYNAUS website for additional articles and workshop listings. 

As editor of this issue, I enjoyed talking with many Senior Teachers and practitioners in our community. On the topic of teachers, especially a yoga teacher’s role in the transformative process, here’s what Manouso Manos had to say:

“Most of us think we can write the script of who our yoga teacher is but we can’t. Of course, you have to find a yoga teacher who speaks directly to your understanding. But that doesn’t mean that the yoga teacher should not be pushing your buttons once in a while, saying, ‘Hey, there’s a little more to this.’ You can’t structure the box of what your yoga practice is. In fact, yoga is, by definition, transformative. The joke that I tell, and I’m not the first one to say this, is that you cannot change and stay the same at the same time.

And this is an example of what most of us want to do in a yoga class. Okay, I want to control this. I want to have this, I want to understand this and you’re not going to push my button. And the answer is, the yoga teacher should always push you into at least a minor state of discomfort. This will encourage you to move into a state where you’re willing to step out of that hard box that most of us are in, out of that control freak and that ego that tries to box us in.”

With gratitude to Guruji, Geetaji, and Prashantji, and a big Mahalo—Thank you—to all who contributed their time and wisdom to our magazine. 

Namaste,
Robin Mishell
Honolulu, Hawaii